Fireside Chat

Elysia Crampton

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ElectronicProfile22 March 2017
Photo by Juri Hiensch

Trans Latinx producer and NON Records collaborator Elysia Crampton details a life weaving the personal and political together through sound.

The music Elysia Crampton makes is intensely political, but it’s also deeply personal, and as a trans person of color, the Virginia-based producer recognizes that separating those two facets of her work is all but impossible. Stylistically, she riffs on various forms of hip-hop, R&B, pop and dance music, using those sounds as raw material while crafting something that sits much further to the left of center. Given Crampton’s heritage (she’s native American) and her memories of growing up outside of Monterrey, Mexico, it’s no surprise that some Latin rhythms occasionally find their way into the mix as well. Her earliest efforts surfaced under the name E&E, but 2015 saw her shedding the moniker in favor of her real name, just in time for the release of her debut album, American Drift, which arrived via FaltyDL’s Blueberry label. The LP received widespread critical acclaim, and also shined a light on what Crampton had to say, which was just as important as the music itself. Both on record and as a public persona, she isn’t afraid to explore queer theory and challenge traditional notions of gender and sexuality, making her one of the more intriguing new voices to emerge from the electronic music sphere in recent years.

5:33

Elysia Crampton’s family helped to found and build the small Bolivian town of Santa Fe in the Yungas.

31:50

Here, Crampton is referring to her close friend and collaborator, Chino Amobi, who recently announced his debut album PARADISO.

55:58

Felix Lee is South London electronic musician Lexxi, who released “Red Eyez” in 2016 on Endless Xclusive.

57:27

September 5 marks the International Day of Indigenous Women commemorating the execution of native Aymara guerrilla Bartolina Sisa, who led an uprising of indigenous peoples against Spanish colonists in 18th century Bolivia. Read more about the heroic woman and the movement she ignited here.

Credits:
Interview by Henning Lahmann
Written and produced by Tobias Jansen

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